Britons given Mexico travel warning as danger could cause 'considerable loss to life'

Santa Catarina River after tropical storm Alberto / Quintana Roo, Mexico

Britons have been given fresh guidance on holidaying in Mexico

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Anna Barry

By Anna Barry


Published: 21/06/2024

- 11:23

Britons in Mexico have been given fresh guidance as the country could face heavy rains, landslides, mudslides and flooding

Britons in Mexico have been issued an important safety warning following a tropical storm.

In recent days, holidaymakers were advised that floods and high winds could hit parts of the country, and a tropical storm warning was put in place along the coast of Tamaulipas state.


As of today, while tropical storm warnings have been lifted, risks remain of heavy rains, landslides, mudslides and flooding.

The Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) said: "Tropical Storm Alberto made landfall on the morning of Thursday, June 20 in northeastern Mexico.

Tulum, Mexico

A new travel warning has been shared for popular holiday hotspot Mexico

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"The storm has now calmed and tropical storm warnings have been lifted, however, there remains a risk of heavy rains, landslides, mudslides and flooding, including flash flooding in both rural and urban areas."

Britons were advised to consult the FCDO's guidance on Tropical Cyclones "for more details about what to expect in the aftermath of a storm".

The FCDO added: "Heavy rainfall associated with the storm system is also affecting large regions along the southeast coast of Mexico, including the Yucatan Peninsula, with flooding and mudslides likely."

In its extreme weather and natural hazards guidance, the FCDO said: "Every year, tropical cyclones cause considerable loss of life, do immense damage to property, and damage transport, electricity and communication infrastructure.

"Tropical cyclones feed on heat that is released when moist air rises. ‘Hurricane season’ happens in the months in which an area of sea is at its warmest."

The highest risk of a Tropical Cyclone is between June and November in the Northern Hemisphere Tropics (Caribbean, Atlantic, Southeast Asia, Pacific, Far East).



In the Southern Hemisphere Tropics (for example, East Africa coast) the highest risk is between November to April.

Britons on holiday were warned that tropical cyclones can cause high winds where buildings can be damaged or destroyed, trees, power and telephone lines fall, and flying debris becomes dangerous.

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Santa Catarina River after tropical storm Alberto

There remains a risk of heavy rains, landslides, mudslides and flooding in the aftermath of the storm

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They can also cause a storm surge. The FCDO said: "A hurricane can cause a temporary rise in sea level of several metres which can flood coastal areas and damage buildings on the shoreline."

A tropical cyclone can also result in very heavy rainfall, which can cause localised or widespread flooding and mudslides.

Britons visiting Mexico should consult the UK Government's advice on entry requirements, safety and security, regional risks, health and how to get help in an emergency.

The FCDO advises against all but essential travel to parts of Mexico.

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