Vladimir Putin tests 'nuclear-capable' missile in eerie warning to the West

Vladimir Putin tests 'nuclear-capable' missile in eerie warning to the West

WATCH NOW: Russia's "successful" intercontinental ballistic missile test launch

Reuters
Holly Bishop

By Holly Bishop


Published: 14/04/2024

- 14:22

Updated: 15/04/2024

- 15:18

The Russian Defence Ministry launched the missile in the Kapustin Yar, stating that the test achieved its results 'in full'

Putin has test-launched an intercontinental ballistic missile in a frightening new warning to the West.

The launch took place at the Kapustin Yar testing range in the Arstrakhan, with footage released by the Russian Defence Ministry showing the missile rising through the sky.


The ministry said the test came as part of “state testing of prospective missile systems, as well as confirmation of the stability of missiles in service”.

They stated that the test achieved its results “in full” and confirmed the “high reliability of Russian missiles to ensure (Russia's) strategic security”.

Putin/Missile launch

Putin has test-launched an intercontinental ballistic missile in a frightening new warning to the West

Reuters

The type of missile used was not specified, however, a Kremlin spokesperson revealed that it was dispatched from a mobile land-based launcher.

Locals who witnessed the launch likened the missile to a “strange object” passing through the sky, with some dubbing it a “space jellyfish”.

The launch comes exactly a year since Putin tested a new model of Putin's Topol series, currently referred to as Topol-ME. It was fired from Kapustrin Yar, the same test site as Friday’s launch.

The ministry said the April 2023 launch was aimed at “testing the advanced military supply of intercontinental ballistic missiles”, according to TASS.

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Missile launch

Locals who witnessed the launch likened the missile to a 'strange object' flying through the sky

Reuters

It was launched on April 12, the day Russians mark as Cosmonautics Day which commemorates Yuri Gagarin's journey into space aboard the “Vostok 1” spacecraft in 1961.

It is not believed to be a Satan II nuclear missile, which is capable of carrying 10 or more nuclear warheads.

Russia was expected to put the 208-ton missile on duty at the end of 2022, however, they have been marred with testing delays.

Kremlin propagandists previously boasted one strike could sink the UK under the sea.


Missile launch

The type of missile used was not specified, however, a Kremlin spokesperson revealed that it was dispatched from a mobile land-based launcher

Reuters

But Downing Street dismissed the claim, labelling it “another example of disinformation”.

Russian Telegram channel VChK-OGPU reported last month: “The Krasnoyarsk Machine-Building Plant is experiencing a serious shortage of electronic components….for production of strategic missiles.

“The electronics of the new RS 28 [Sarmat] missile system are largely of foreign origin and, due to sanctions, [they] are experiencing a serious shortage.

“Now all efforts are being made to somehow correct the situation with the supply of sanctioned electronics.”

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