Furious vegan demands Natural History Museum be SHUT DOWN because of cruelty to stuffed animals

An image of Alisha Perry (inset) and Tring's Natural History Museum

An image of Alisha Perry (inset) and Tring's Natural History Museum

PA/GOOGLE STREET VIEW
Jack Walters

By Jack Walters


Published: 15/09/2023

- 15:08

Alisha Perry was hoping to stage a protest in leafy Tring on October 7

A vegan faced mockery online after demanding the “vile” Natural History Museum should close because it stuffs dead animals and puts them on display.

Alisha Perry, who lives in the Hertfordshire town of Tring, posted on a local Facebook group vowing to stage a protest in a few weeks time.


She said: “So, I’m hoping to stage a protest in the town on Saturday, October 7, at around 1pm against the ‘Natural History Museum’.

“I’m disgusted that even such a place exists. As a vegan, I see nothing natural about poor innocent creatures stuffed and put on display in glass cabinets.

An image of a gallery at Tring's Natural History Museum

An image of a gallery at Tring's Natural History Museum

TRING NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM

“It’s 2023 and this kind of vile thing is still seen as a ‘great day out’. It’s teaching future generations that animal cruelty is acceptable and it is not!

“My plan is to march up the High Street from the Robin Hood pub to the ‘Natural History Museum’ on Akeman Street.

“I will be contacting that the council later this week to seek permission NOT THAT WE NEED IT TO LET OUR VOIE BE HEARD! Can’t wait to see you all there! Spread the news!”

The post was soon deleted but GB News managed to catch a glimpse of the often critical responses left by fellow residents.

Tris Rob said: “What a moronic view of the world. The museum captures a moment in time. What do the protesters want? For the history to be destroyed? Not to mention the scientific merit.”

Another image of some of the exhibits at Tring's Natural History Museum

Another image of some of the exhibits at Tring's Natural History Museum

TRING NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM

Jill McCay wrote: “What is the world coming to? Such sensitive people nowadays - I’m an animal-lover but I don’t see the harm in this especially something that has been here for donkeys' years.

Chloe Woey added: “Without institutions such as the Natural History Museum we would not have the knowledge we do. Knowledge that now allows us to understand and possibly protect the natural world. The past is the past and should not be hidden, destroyed or forgotten, from it we learn.”

Liz Harbord also interjected: “This is all very amusing! I took my children to the museum as was I taken back in my day. My boys were so taken with the animals that they both wanted to become vets.

“Not because they were worried about seeing ‘dead animals’ but because a whole new world opened up to them. We have even been with my grandchildren. They loved it. Maybe we can counter protest on the same day. Wouldn’t that be a giggle?”

Taxidermy is legal in the United Kingdom but is covered by strict restrictions under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 and the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES).

There are over 4,900 specimens to see at the Hertfordshire museum

There are over 4,900 specimens to see at the Hertfordshire museum

TRING NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM

Responding to the criticism, Perry despairingly wrote: “I don’t know why I bother. Well I do, because I’m trying to change the world and make it a better place for future generations.”

However, a minority of fellow Tring residents appeared to side with the wannabe protester.

Linda Knights said: “I just hope children seeing it now aren’t encouraged to do the same. It’s a relic and serves no good purpose. Is there a notice for visitors to read to explain that such activity is no longer deemed right?”

Tring’s Natural History Museum was opened to the public in 1892 with the help of Lionel Walter Rothschild

Some 134,208 people visited the Hertfordshire attraction last year.

An image of the Park Street entrance to Tring Natural History Museum

An image of the Park Street entrance to Tring Natural History Museum

TRING NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM

Entry to the museum is free and people can visit the site between 10am and 4pm from Tuesday to Sunday.

Tring’s Natural History Museum is also open on bank holidays.

There are over 4,900 specimens to see at the Hertfordshire museum.

Stuffed animals at the museum include Skye Terrier Wolverley Chummie, a tall emperor penguin, a polar bear and even an extinct Quagga.

GB News has approached Perry for further comment.

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